At Plantlife we’ve created and restored 15,800 acres of wildflower meadows, but on a different scale, your own #SayNoMow patch has a vital part to play. And attract more wildlife and pollinators to your garden? These plants provide a vital food source for pollinators and can make a beautiful feature too. Maximize unmowed areas and encourage native habitat that includes native trees, shrubs, wildflowers, and grasses Reduce frequency of mowing During peak nesting and pollination activity, avoid mowing, namely spring and summer Use a push mower, when possible You might need a scythe or a strimmer for the first cut, but after that a standard mower will be fine. As for the size and shape of your no-mow patch, it’s entirely up to you. Buy from this exclusive range of genuine wildflower seeds and some of the profits go to wildflower conservation. What comes up in your no-mow mini-meadow depends very much on what you start with. Gardens, of course, cannot substitute ancient meadows in the wild. One of the best ways to encourage wildflowers in your garden is to leave a patch of lawn to its own devices during spring and summer. Try to resist cutting until at least the middle of July – or even into early September if you can. Aim to cut the grass down hard to a few centimetres in height. Other areas they leave totally neglected after a winter cut in December and are rewarded with carpets of primroses in March and April, followed by cowslips in May. Don’t drown the seeds. Leave a patch of lawn to its own devices during spring and summer, and the chances are that at least some wildflowers will appear in your new mini-meadow. If you don’t do this, any rotting debris will fertilise the ground, encouraging tough grasses to take over at the expense of the wildflowers you're trying to encourage. The flowers are a beautiful sight and a lovely link to my childhood. In wildflower meadows on acid soil in Wales and Scotland you’ll find harebell, tormentil and devil’s-bit scabious, among others. Use a lawn mower with the grass box on. My wife and I are keen on helping wildlife and enjoy encouraging wildlife into our garden. It’s not essential that you mow your wildflower area in autumn and winter but it does help keep soil fertility down and it does keep things looking neat. This is the most important principle in establishing a wildflower meadow. My neighbours probably think I am mad but I don't care. You will lose some flowers as you mow, but you will also encourage new flowers – think of it as pruning to encourage healthy growth. In wildflower meadows on acid soil in Wales and Scotland you'll find harebell, tormentil and devil's-bit scabious, among others. Wildflower seeds need moisture to get started. If you follow these simple instructions your wild flower lawn should survive indefinitely and bring you much pleasure and fascination year after year. I love looking at wildflowers on my walks and I enjoy photographing them. If, like me, your lawn is old, rather weedy, and probably hasn’t encountered weedkillers or fertilisers for years, a bit more conscious neglect could transform it into a thriving mini-meadow. Then leave it alone and enjoy the flowers through spring and the following summer. Definitely finish before the end of August. via Facebook, Ann Chapman: Best thing I ever did. At Plantlife, the wildflower charity that's behind the Wildflower Garden, we've laid down the no-mow challenge to our supporters, asking them to share pictures on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #SayNoMow. The exact timing of the first cut depends on the year and the weather, but a later cut will help species like knapweed and orchids to spread, while earlier cuts can help control competitive species, such as common hogweed. Or that awkward patch of shade? Barely cover seeds when sown in rows. You never quite know what to expect from your no-mow patch, which is a large part of the pleasure for me. If you have a small lawn, try a 1 metre-square micro-meadow. Not only will it attract wildlife into your garden, but it will look lovely too – a powerful reminder that we should value what’s left and support all efforts to restore wildflower meadows. created and restored 15,800 acres of wildflower meadows. The rich, lustrous glow of buttercup petals and the cheery, vibrant appearance of the contrasting yellow centres and white rays of daisies add a great deal of pleasure to a spring or summer walk. The trend for wildflower meadows leads to substituting lawns for sowing a meadow of flowering annuals which looks great for a summer and then dies away. Green lawns can be beautiful, but a new movement is afoot to dedicate yard space to a wildflower garden to bring a explosion of color to the eye. We cultivated this Shaded Area wildflower mix, so that it contains only the wildflowers that are the very best at growing in little light and are similar to what you would find growing naturally beneath trees or in a woodland setting. If you want to attract bees, increase insect populations and decrease your time spent tending to the grass, then you can safely know that a wildflower lawn is worth the time and effort you are just about to take. Or maybe the pond? We are developing a mobile app that will make it easy to create wildflower habitats and collect data on pollinator abundance and diversity. For those of you who prefer a cleaner look, this gives you most of the benefits of mowing the wildflowers down and also leaving some varieties for the birds to snack on. You’ll soon see species such as rough hawkbit, yarrow and selfheal coming through, dependi… Get free wildflower gardening tips by email. What wildflowers can you grow in your garden? Cut the grass free lawn on a high setting, you don’t want to scalp the plants, you just need to make sure the lower growing varieties get enough light. What comes up in your no-mow mini-meadow depends very much on what you start with. Pick a site with moderately fertile earth, an excellent sward structure, and very limited amounts of perennial weeds or vigorous grasses. G rowing a wildflower meadow area in your garden can be a satisfying way of attracting wildlife, is beautiful to look at and you don't necessarily need loads of space. No need to cover the seed. Hi growies, Can one of you help me revive an herbicide ridden section of the lawn into a wildflower field/pollinator garden? A weedy area converted to wildflowers will have a large reservoir of weed seeds in the soil, ready to germinate when conditions are favorable. The other reason is that the grass clippings could smother germinating wildflower seeds that are trying to get a foothold during late summer and autumn. One of the best ways to encourage wildflowers in your garden is to leave a patch of lawn to its own devices during spring and summer. At the other extreme, why not leave most of the lawn unmown with just a few paths meandering through? Make sure the blades are sharp. Just as in wildflower meadows across Britain, each with their own regional character and identity, your soil type will determine which flowers will grow. If it’s a small enough patch you might even get by with a pair of garden shears. A new meadow can be grown from seed on carefully prepared soil, a lawn can be released from weekly mowing and meadow wildflowers added, or old fields or roadsides can be diversified by reducing and timing mowing to support native plant flowering and reproduction. Avoid putting cuttings in the compost unless you want wildflowers appearing in every part of the garden. The chances are that at least some wildflowers will appear if you leave the lawnmower alone. So there is no reason why you shouldn't expect these at home, too. Can't wait until next year! Try cutting different areas at different times and see how your wildflowers respond. If you are on heavy clay, however, it is better to wait until spring. Leave a patch of lawn to its own devices during spring and summer, and the chances are that at least some wildflowers will appear in your new mini-meadow. Your new wildflower garden starts here. At the other extreme, why not leave most of the lawn unmown with just a few paths meandering through? Would you like to do less mowing? Chances are you'll get meadow buttercup, oxeye daisy and bird's-foot trefoil on neutral or limey soils. Lawn weedkillers should not be used, as these will kill the wildflowers you wish to encourage Where grasses become dominant try sowing the annual wildflower, yellow rattle (Rhinanthus minor) which is semi-parasitic on grasses. This will encourage more diversity but stop the grasses dominating. Take a look at our instructions for sowing wildflower seeds in trays. Benefits of Wildflower Lawns Protection of Biodiversity. You couldn’t have fruits or veggies without pollination, so planting wildflowers in the garden, even amongst your edibles, is a great way to ensure a good harvest. Avoid putting cuttings in the compost unless you want wildflowers appearing in every part of the garden. Jackie Isard: My wild patch. Adopt a two-cut approach to your lawn, mowing once in autumn and then again in spring, removing all of the cut grass. Gardening on acid soil? This gives the wildflowers a chance to complete their cycle of growing, flowering and setting seed. If you want to encourage wildflowers in your garden, leave your lawn to its own devices, argues Trevor Dines, botanist at conservation charity Plantlife, Last modified on Wed 29 Mar 2017 13.53 EDT. But these days, thriving wildflower meadows are an increasingly rare sight – over 97% of them have been destroyed since the 1930s, disappearing under the plough or being converted to silage fields. In most cases, it is advisable to consider weed control in two phases – as part of site preparation prior to planting, and as an important component of a post-germination maintenance program. Shift your perspective slightly and, like a botanical version of the ugly duckling story, many of these so-called weeds will grow into lovely wildflowers. So if you're looking for inspiration, why not start here? It's best to mow your mini-meadow a few times more until around Christmas, removing the clippings each time. You never quite know what to expect from your no-mow patch, which is a large part of the pleasure for me. This is because the average lawn is usually home to what many would describe as weeds. This will lower fertility and give perennial wildflowers a chance to push through the grass. The best things to do to encourage wildflowers into your patch is to stop mowing. Grass on limey soils may throw up a cowslip or two. While a wildflower lawn may never be a “true” meadow, there is a time and place for it – and that time is now. There are few things in this world, horticultural or otherwise, that can compare with the simple beauty of a wildflower garden. via Facebook, Pyramidal orchids in a no-mow patch © Dominic Murphy, Oxeye daisies in a no-mow patch © Trevor Dines. Moisten the soil every day until the seeds germinate. Then leave it alone and enjoy the flowers through spring and the following summer. Try cutting different areas at different times and see how your wildflowers respond. On the latter, maybe you’ll get cowslips, that rarity clustered bellflower or the beautiful blue pincushions of field scabious in late summer. I've also bought seeds to sow this autumn. Not only will it attract wildlife into your garden, but it will look lovely too – a powerful reminder that we should value what’s left and support all efforts to restore wildflower meadows. Take a break from mowing your lawn (or a small area of it) to encourage the growth of nectar-rich plants, such as clover. Say ‘no to the mow’ and create a wildflower meadow! Next to a pond, it is one of the best things you can add to a garden. When you see sprouts starting to come up from the soil, then the seeds have successfully germinated. Rewild our lawn. Our Alternative Lawn Wildflower Seed Mix features a mix of 13 clover, grasses, and low-growing wildflowers to create a flowering lawn with sprays of subtle color. As opposed to a few species in a lawn, you can grow many in a wildflower meadow. You may need a scythe or a strimmer for the first cut, but after that a standard mower will be fine. After you’ve cut the grass in late summer, it’s extremely important to remove all the cuttings. The exact timing of the first cut depends on the year and the weather, but a later cut will help species like knapweed and orchids to spread, while earlier cuts can help control competitive species, such as common hogweed. Gardens, of course, cannot substitute ancient meadows in the wild. At Plantlife we’ve created and restored 15,800 acres of wildflower meadows, but on a different scale, your own #SayNoMow patch has a vital part to play. But these days, thriving wildflower meadows are an increasingly rare sight – more than 97% of them have been destroyed since the 1930s, disappearing under the plough or being converted to silage fields. Never scalp wild flowers – the lowest you should allow the sward to … It all depends on your location, soil type, amount of sun and shade, but any number of plants past 20, and you are onto something good. Left alone, a modest expectation from your turf would be pretty little plants such as daisies, speedwell, self-heal, buttercups and clovers. I have planted bubs for spring and now waiting for the wild flowers to come into bloom. If it's a small enough patch you might even get by with a pair of garden shears. Having said that, it’s also good to leave some strips or edges uncut as refuges for insects. One of the best ways to encourage wildflowers in your garden is to forget the lawnmower and just let your grass grow. Dig over the area, rake it to a fine tilth and sprinkle wild flower seeds on top. Growing wildflowers in shady spaces doesn’t have to be difficult – all you need is the right seed! O ne of the best ways to encourage wildflowers in your garden is to forget the lawnmower and just let your grass grow. These beauties need light to stimulate germination. Only apply enough water to keep the soil moist. Plus enjoy months of flowers on your lawn? The chances are that at least some wildflowers … A no-mow lawn should produce pretty little plants such as daisies, speedwell, self-heal, buttercups and clovers. This gives the wildflowers a chance to complete their cycle of growing, flowering and setting seed. Gardening on acid soil? Picture a gently sloping mountain meadow filled with the delicate blossoms of yellow Plains coreopsis (Coreopsis tinctoria), orange California poppies (Eschscholzia californica), and lacey baby’s breath (Gypsophila elegans). Encouraging a slice of the wild in your garden can be a satisfying way of attracting a wide diversity of birds, bees, butterflies and other wildlife. They are fully hardy to survive the winter and dry summers. Choose wildflower varieties that require similar sunlight, water and nutrient levels. Understated groundcover plants are low-maintenance and a great choice for stabilizing sloped or uneven areas. ‘Shift your perspective slightly and, like a botanical version of the ugly duckling story, many so-called weeds will grow into lovely wildflowers.’. At this point, the wildflowers require less maintenance. You'll be aiming to cut the grass down hard to a few centimetres in height. In the section that you did mow, remember to leave the cut foliage on the ground until spring. But don’t let technical talk of soil types put you off. Use our free tool to select wildflowers that are right for you, then download your list. But don't let technical talk of soil types put you off. The other reason is that the grass clippings could smother germinating wildflower seeds that are trying to get a foothold during late summer and autumn. Want something for the border? Once the grass and flowers have been allowed to grow, the key to maintaining your mini-meadow is through your diary of mowing. If, like me, your lawn is old, rather weedy, and probably hasn’t encountered weedkillers or fertilisers for years, a bit more conscious neglect could transform it into a thriving mini-meadow. Your low flowering lawn wild flowers are all perennial which means they will survive year after year without the need for re-seeding. After you've cut the grass in late summer, it's extremely important to remove all the cuttings. To grow annual wild flowers in your lawn, use a spade to lift an area of turf in spring time. So if you’re looking for inspiration, why not start here? What comes up in your no-mow patch depends very much on what you start with. Don’t be tempted to add manure or fertiliser as this will encourage excessive vigour in the grasses, which then swamp the wildflowers. The prairie grass and wildflower seeds do not root and grow unless they are in contact with bare soil. This basic regime of cutting the grass from late summer to the end of the year mimics the traditional pattern of hay-cutting followed by grazing, to which many meadow flowers are adapted. So there is no reason why you shouldn’t expect these at home, too. Shift your perspective slightly and, like a botanical version of the ugly duckling story, many of these so-called weeds will grow into lovely wildflowers. Try to resist cutting until at least the middle of July – or even into early September if you can. At Plantlife, we’ve laid down the no-mow challenge to our supporters, asking them to share pictures on Instagram and Twitter with the hashtag #SayNoMow. If you get more invasive plants like nettle or dock, it’s best to pull these up by hand. I am temporarily living with a family in suburbia, and they are encouraging me to grow more flowers in their small yard. But oxeye daisies, cowslips and even orchids might appear too. Just as in wildflower meadows across Britain, each with their own regional character and identity, your soil type will determine which flowers will grow. On the latter, maybe you'll get cowslips, that rarity clustered bellflower or the beautiful blue pin-cushions of field scabious in late summer. A friend In Dorset mows part of their lawn up to mid-April, which encourages pyramidal orchids to grow. A densely-planted garden is more ecological than a lawn as it uses less water and no synthetic chemicals, and of course no mowing is required. Select a garden site that receives the amount of sunlight necessary for the wildflower varieties. If you have a small lawn, try a 1m-square micro-meadow. But oxeye daisies, cowslips and even orchids might appear too. Having said that, it's also good to leave some strips or edges uncut as refuges for insects. Here are two things to keep in mind if you are considering planting a meadow: The Lawn to Wildflowers project helps people create habitats for these helpful insects by turning turf grass lawns into native wildflower plots. Surpass 30 species and your new lawn is just about as diverse as it can get. A friend In Dorset mows part of their lawn up to mid-April, which encourages pyramidal orchids to grow. Or, sow tiny pinches of seed directly into small modules of seed compost and plant as ‘plugs’. If you get more invasive plants like nettle or dock, it’s best to pull these up by hand. Scatter wildflower seeds thinly over bare patches of watered soil or in rows in a seedbed to transplant later as small clumps. Other areas they leave totally neglected after a winter cut in December and are rewarded with carpets of primroses in March and April, followed by cowslips in May. Chances are you’ll get meadow buttercup, oxeye daisy and bird’s-foot trefoil on neutral or limey soils. If you don’t do this, any rotting debris will fertilise the ground, encouraging tough grasses to take over at the expense of the wildflowers you’re trying to encourage. If you want to plant wildflowers on your lawn, experts suggest that you plant the seed on top of your existing grass. Left alone, a modest expectation from your turf would be pretty little plants such as daisies, speedwell, self-heal, buttercups and clovers (check out our interactive wildflower selector). via Facebook, Jeremy Bartlett: Our small wildflower meadow is now three years old and is full of life. This is because the average lawn is usually home to what many would describe as ‘weeds’. Once the grass and flowers have been allowed to grow, the key to maintaining your mini-meadow is through your diary of mowing. Sow in autumn, giving the seed time to settle in over winter. This basic regime of cutting the grass from late summer to the end of the year mimics the traditional pattern of hay-cutting followed by grazing, to which many meadow flowers are adapted. Attractive to beneficial insects.Wildflowers help to encourage bees and other important pollinators to the area. We'd generally say cut an established wildflower meadow in sections from the end of July, leaving several days between each to encourage diversity. Sow this in August and keep the grass mown until March Save to … It’s best to mow your mini-meadow a few times more until around Christmas, removing the clippings each time. As for the size and shape of your no-mow patch, it’s entirely up to you.